The Champion Of Paribanou: In Brief

Key facts relating to Alan Ayckbourn's The Champion Of Paribanou.
  • The Champion Of Paribanou is Alan Ayckbourn's 50th play.
  • The world premiere was held at the Stephen Joseph Theatre, Scarborough, on 29 November 1996.
  • It was the first new Ayckbourn play to be staged at the Stephen Joseph Theatre, Scarborough, following the venue's opening in April of the same year. Previous Ayckbourn productions that year (By Jeeves and It Could be Any One Of Us) are considered revised revivals.
  • The play was inspired by the tale of The Magic Carpet from The Thousand And One Nights (or The Arabian Nights), which Alan read to himself during a Christmas party having received a book of the story from a grab-bag.
  • One of the other motivations for writing such an ambitious and technically challenging play (which includes a flying carpet) was Alan's desire to show-off what the new theatre was capable of.
  • The play is credited as being influenced by George Lucas (creator of the Star Wars saga), science fiction author Isaac Asimov, the writer Robert Louis Stevenson and the films Alan enjoyed watching as a young boy.
  • Although strictly speaking Salim is an automaton, he is essentially one of a long tradition of malfunctioning robots in Alan Ayckbourn's plays such as NAN300F in Henceforward…, PADWAC in Callisto#7, Jacie Triplethree in Comic Potential, Sadie in My Sister Sadie and Jan in Surprises.
  • The Champion of Paribanou is one of Alan Ayckbourn's 'family' plays; these plays are written with a family audience in mind, but are considered by the playwright to be part of his full-length play canon and as significant in his canon as any of the other plays. Alan Ayckbourn's first family play is considered to be Mr A's Amazing Maze Plays in 1988.
  • Alan Ayckbourn revived the play at the Stephen Joseph Theatre during the theatre's 50th anniversary year (the anniversary of the opening of the Library Theatre in Scarborough) in 2005.
  • Although rarely revived, Alan Ayckbourn has said he considers it a favourite amongst the plays he has written.
Copyright: Simon Murgatroyd. Please do not reproduce without the permission of the copyright holder.